Fiction · Science Fiction · Young Adult

The Grace Year

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Title: The Grace Year

Author: Kim Liggett

Page Count: 416

Series: N/A

Publishing Date/Publisher: October 8, 2019 by Wednesday Books

Format: Hardcover

Review: This book has been likened to the Handmaid’s Tale, and I would say that is fairly accurate.  Liggett took a page from Atwood’s handbook and created a world ruled by men who will do everything in their power to subjugate women.  It was bloody, it was brutal, and it was ripe with misogyny.  In this society, young women are blamed for their sexuality and are sent to a special camp to “burn off their magic.”  Rather than band together, the girls are torn apart by jealousy and girl on girl cruelty.

My biggest issue with this book is the lack of world building.  The reader is simply dropped into an insular society of undetermined size that is using a story from the Bible to justify the dehumanization of women.  The society is very primitive, and it is unclear to me how this dystopian society came into existence.  I generally like some context for dystopian novels, so I had great difficulty buying the setting.

I think this book has the potential to garner some popularity because there are still many readers who love dystopian fiction, but I do not think it does anything new to revolutionize the genre.

Reader: Bekah

Rating:

All_Star_GoldAll_Star_GoldAll_Star_Gold

 

Fiction · Romance · Science Fiction

The UnTied Kingdom

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Title: The UnTied Kingdom

Author: Kate Johnson

Performer: Julia Barrie

Length: 15 hr, 4 min

Series: N/A

Publishing Date/Publisher: 2013 by Recorded Books

Format: eAudiobook

Review: Well I didn’t love it as much as I thought I would, but it was still an enjoyable read.  The narrator was easy to listen to, and the story for the most part had a lot of action.  This book was surprisingly light on romance for a romance novel.  It was clear from the beginning who the fated pair would be, but the romance really doesn’t blossom until well into the last half of the book.

I am always a little leary of “time travel” books because I find the concept to be so confusing and overdone.  I would consider this to be more of a “parallel universe” book with very little explanation as to how the hole between worlds works.  The parallel universe Eve lands in is more of an alternate history where the trajectory of significant historical events has been changed, resulting in Britain essentially becoming a third world country that has been torn apart by civil wars.  I would have liked to know more about how the rest of this reimagined world works, but you only get snippets here and there throughout the story.  In a lot of ways this makes the story very insular and I was left with many questions.  It is always interesting to think about how changing the past might affect the future, and it is fascinating to consider how even one decision could change the whole course of history.  I suppose Johnson could write a thousand novels based on this topic and I would still have questions, so I must be content with the brief glimpse I am given in this one.

Reader: Bekah

Rating: 

All_Star_GoldAll_Star_GoldAll_Star_Gold

Contemporary · Science Fiction · Young Adult

Internment

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Title: Internment

Author: Samira Ahmed

Page Count: 386

Series: N/A

Publishing Date/Publisher: March 19, 2019 by Atom

Format: Hardcover

Review: This is one of those books that readers seem to either love or hate, but I actually fall somewhere in the middle.  It is a speculative novel that heavily draws on current events (more than a few jabs directed at the current administration) and links it with the Japanese-American Internment camps of the 1940s.  In this imagining, Muslim-Americans are targeted as enemies of state and relocated to internment camps on American soil.

I thought the concept for this book was interesting, and I could appreciate the historical tie-ins, but I think it fell short of being great.  My biggest issue with this book was the villain.  “The Director” is portrayed as a cruel man who easily loses his cool and throws violent tantrums.  He was incredibly one-dimensional, and was really a caricature of the “racist middle-age white man” that has become so vilified by our culture.  Of course, all the prison guards were also white men, because apparently there is no diversity in the National Guard.

The cover art for this book is gorgeous, and that really drew me to the book more than anything.  I think it appropriately captures the essence of the story and I imagine it has drawn in a lot of other readers as well.  I think that this book will really appeal to teens and it would be a great discussion book for teachers to assign when studying World War II and the Japanese-American internment camps because it offers a fresh setting that they may better relate to.

Reader: Bekah

Rating: 

All_Star_GoldAll_Star_GoldAll_Star_Goldhalf star

Fiction · Science Fiction

The Lightest Object in the Universe

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Title: The Lightest Object in the Universe

Author: Kimi Eisele

Page Count: 336

Series: Unknown

Publishing Date/Publisher: July 9, 2019 by Algonquin Books

Format: eBook

Review: For people who enjoy realistic dystopian fiction, this would be a great book recommendation.  There is nothing unique about this book that sets it apart from other books I have read in this genre, but I did find the setting and backstory to be very plausible.  I also thought it was very romantic to have one character trekking across the United States to be reunited with his faraway love.

There was nothing particularly surprising about this story (no plot twists); however, it kept a steady pace and was a pretty quick read.  I had a little bit of trouble at times following the plot because the formatting was off in my ARC copy (it would switch POV without warning), but I assume this will be fixed when the book goes through its final edits.

Reader: Bekah

Rating: 

All_Star_GoldAll_Star_GoldAll_Star_Gold

Fiction · Mystery · Science Fiction · Thriller

DOUBLE REVIEW: The Psychology of Time Travel

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Title: The Psychology of Time Travel

Author: Kate Mascarenhas

Page Count: 372

Series: N/A

Publishing Date/Publisher: 12 February 2019 by Crooked Lane Books (originally published August 9th 2018 by Head of Zeus)

Format: eBook

Reader: Kymberly

Review:

I don’t think I can accurately describe just how much I love this book, but I will try.

It had me hooked from the start, grabbing me instantly with the strong, smart, vulnerable women, and kept me hooked through the entire story. The relative lack of men was an added, welcome, and refreshing change of pace from most books I’ve read. I’ve also noticed that most books and movies/television shows involving time travel make the reader/viewer do some mental gymnastics in order to wrap their head around the whole concept, however Mascarenhas does all that for you, leaving your brain free to try to dissect the murder mystery.

I also loved how the story is woven together and how organized it is, despite it being about a very disorganized subject. This made it easy to read and impossible to put down.

I have already started telling all my friends about this book and will continue to bother them until each and everyone of them reads it. I was utterly blown away and loved every minute of it.

Rating: 

All_Star_GoldAll_Star_GoldAll_Star_GoldAll_Star_Gold

All_Star_Gold

Review: This book thoroughly boggled my brain.  The concept of time travel makes absolutely zero sense to me.  This book is technically a murder mystery, but oddly it didn’t feel to me like a murder mystery at all.  The mystery itself became more of a subplot as I struggled to wrap my head around the various concepts detailed in the book pertaining to time chronology, “genies”, and other time travel concepts.   I liked the book, but I was honestly too confused by it to love it.

Reader: Bekah

Rating: 

All_Star_GoldAll_Star_GoldAll_Star_Goldhalf star